Wednesday, 13 September 2017

REVIEW: I'd Rather Be Reading: A Library of Art for Book Lovers

I'd Rather be Reading: A Library of Art for Book LoversFor anyone who'd rather be reading than doing just about anything else, this book is the ultimate must-have. In this visual ode to all things bookish, readers will get lost in page after page of beautiful contemporary art, photography, and illustrations depicting the pleasures of books. Artwork from the likes of Jane Mount, Lisa Congdon, Julia Rothman, and Sophie Blackall is interwoven with text from essayist Maura Kelly, bestselling author Gretchen Rubin, and award-winning author and independent bookstore owner Ann Patchett. Rounded out with poems, quotations, and aphorisms celebrating the joys of reading, this lovingly curated compendium is a love letter to all things literary, and the perfect gift for bookworms everywhere.


Whilst this book is small in stature and page length, the content inside is a treasure trove of wonders that any bibliophile could happily lose themselves in. I'd Rather Be Reading is an ode to the bookish; a collage of unturned pages, and a tapestry of the binding connections that a love for literature can form. I do't know what I quite expected when this arrived in the post in August, but it was a joyous surprise to receive a little book of curious power that will remind any reader of why they adore books. 

The summary on the cover of I'd Rather Be Reading describes the book as "a library of art for book lovers" and not only does it fufill this premise, but does so in spectacular fashion. Though this book is about the printed word, the homage to literature extends beyond the realms of text and into art, typography, quotations, and simply the most stunning photos of books and libraries one could possibly want bound together and pressed into their palms. This now should probably be broken down into mini-reviews of each essay. Ahem...



Each essay brought a different kind of joy to me that I never thought would come through this book. The editor herself Guinevere de la Mare discusses her life lived throughout books and how she wants to imprint the same burning desire to read into her young son. The most beautiful element of this essay is de la Mare realising how her ancestry of bibliophiles has shaped her future as she reads Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone to her afformentioned child. But above all, the profound message that lies among her masterful words is that we can live lives filled with literature, but life is too short to be wasted on poor quality books that we are reading for the sake of reading something. Rather, we should curate our personal libraries and literary tastes, instead of reading whatever  is on the market or what our peers are reading. 

Maura Kelly's essay "A Slow Books Manifesto" continued on de la Mare's gentle preaching of reading good quality books, but also having a decent quality of life through reading. Following the notion that we are spending our lives consumed by "empty-calorie entertainment" Kelly suggests, rightfully so, that we use the time that is so consistently wasted scrolling through our smartphones and instead pull out our books. On the whole, the general idea of the essay concludes with the knowledge that a life is better lived with books, but one needs to make the time to read, even just a small amount, each and every day in order to lead a more fulfilled life. And I must say, I wholeheartedly agree!



"Cheating" by Ann Pratchett was probably by far my favourite essay in I'd Rather Be Reading. As the owner of Parnasus Books, renowned in the book community and highly recommended by one of my favourite authors, V.E. Schwab, Pratchett discusses the struggle to list what our favourite books are, when we can categorise them so easily into different smaller categories. Instead, she provides lists of recommendations that she has inhaled over her years as a bookseller and bookshop owner, gorgeously compiled with such a love it exudes from the page. I, like I am sure any reader would, came away with a whole new section on my Goodreads TBR as inspired by this essay. The thought of all the books I hadn't read but longed to that were on Pratchett's lists just made me want to read everything, and to be able to create that in a reader is just a magical, magical thing.

Finally, Gretchen Rubin's "13 Tips for Getting More Reading Done" does exactly was it says in the title. It isn't anything revolutionary, but it certainly feels fitting to, after pages upon pages of creating bookish wanderlust, to help readers find more ways to get said reading done. There's some advice on this list that I'm opposed to, but I think the best thig Rubin did with this list was add the reading advice of world famous authors in the latter half, as those words, words created by genuiuses when it comes to stringing sentences then chapters then books together, is so awe-inspiring that anyone will be bursting to read by the final page. 


The perfect gift for fellow book lovers, or just to oneself, if you're looking for a way to indulge in your sheer adoration for old dusty pages, mysteries and the feeling of reaching the final chapter and just wanting more, then I'd Rather Be Reading is the book for you.


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